The Bermuda Police Service is once again advising members of the public to remain vigilant regarding phone calls, e-mails and other correspondence from unknown persons that attempt to obtain personal information or other sensitive data – or even attempt to extort money. The below section of a recent e-mail received locally clearly illustrates the tactic:

From: Antonie Pandey <ovomarionhh@outlook.com>

Date: 11 July 2018 at 8:58:54 PM GMT-3

I am awaré, _____, is your password. You don’t know me and you ãrè probábly thinking why you’rè gétting this mail, correct?

In fact, I installed a malwâre on the ãdult vids (pornogrâphic matèrial) web-site ánd you know what, you visited this website to have fun (you know what I meán). Whilé you were watching video clips, your internét browser stärted functioning as ã RDP (Remote Dèsktop) that has a key loggèr which provided me with accèssibility to your display and wéb cam. Immediately aftér that, my softwarè program obtained ãll of your contacts from your Messengèr, FB, as well as email.

What èxactly did I do? I made ã double-screen video. 1st part shows the video you were viewing (you have a nice taste haha . . .), and second pârt displays the recording of your cäm.

Whát should you do? Well, in my opinion, $2900 is ä fair price for our littlé sécret. You’ll màke the pàyment by Bitcoin (if you do not know this, search “how to buy bitcoin” in Googlè).

A policeman spokesman said: “Such e-mails should be ignored. The recipient that reported this e-mail to police did not comply with the demand.

In addition, residents are reminded that personal information regarding banking details, dates of birth, addresses, phone numbers and computer access are valuable and that this information should never be relayed over the internet or phone to unknown persons.  

“Any incidents of suspected internet fraud should be reported to the Financial Crime Unit on telephone number 247-1757 or via the e-mail address fraud2@bps.bm.”