News Release: HAMILTON, Bermuda – “When the Garages Licensing Act 2022 came into force earlier this month (4 November), it represented a significant regulatory overhaul for public garages. We now have enforceable regulations to curtail the operation of unlicensed facilities and mechanics to protect the consumer. The Act set out new garage classes, licence and renewal fees and created offences and penalties for non-compliance,” said Minister of Transport, Wayne Furbert.

Minister Furbert continued: “This new legislation was tabled in response to complaints received by the Transport Control Department (TCD) and the Office of Consumer Affairs from members of the public.  Examples of the complaints are  increased levels of noise and air pollution, sub-standard work produced by unqualified individuals, servicing and repairs of vehicles at private residences, cars parked and abandoned on public roads and in public parks, conducting business during inconvenient times and restricting road access when vehicles in for repair are parked on public roads preventing the passage of public, emergency or garbage collection vehicles. 

“There are now eight different types of garage licences, and the legislation includes the process by which the respective licences can be acquired. Also included is the process for renewing licences, the duration and reasons why a licence may be revoked. Further, it specifies the rights to enter and inspect garages, what can happen if a ‘Stop Order’ is contravened, and how to launch an appeal. It should be noted that the Director of the TCD may issue a ‘Stop Order’, an administrative role previously held by the Minister of Transport.” 

Transport Minister added: “The new legislation also included an amendment to the Traffic Offences (Penalties) Act 1976 that increased the fine for non-compliant licence plates from $25 to $500 per plate. It is important that vehicles can be properly identified in the event of an accident or emergency. Illegal license plates can also frustrate the efforts of law enforcement or ordinary citizens when using the roads. The increased penalty reflects the seriousness of the offence and the importance we place on the safety of road users.

“Motorcycles are included in these amendments because they also fall under the Motor Car (Examination, Licensing and Registration) Regulations 1952.

“The legislation states that the characters, meaning numbers and letters on licence plates, must appear black against a white background.Also, the letter or letters and all figures on the plate shall be not less than three inches high and spaced correctly (see attached). For motorcycles, the characters must appear green on a white background.”