A tropical storm watch remains in effect tonight for the local area as Tropical Storm Earl strengthened into a hurricane, packing maximum sustained winds of 80 mph with higher gusts.

At last check, the hurricane was moving north at 6 mph as it strengthens into a major, Category 3 storm as it passes east of Bermuda Thursday night.

A tropical storm watch remains in effect for Bermuda.

Earl is expected to eventually move northeast, away from any land mass.

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center say: “Earl is expected to eventually move northeast, away from any land mass.

“Earl’s center is expected to pass to the southeast of Bermuda in 48-60 hours. However, the size of the wind field of the tropical cyclone is expected to increase significantly, and the Bermuda Weather Service has issued a tropical storm watch.”

The storm is forecast to move northeast from there, away from any land mass.

Earl became the fifth named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, forming 185 miles east of the Leeward Islands.

Bermuda is under a tropical storm watch.

Meanwhile, Hurricane Danielle, which became the first hurricane of the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season, was still churning far out in the ocean “producing a large area of dangerous seas over the north-central Atlantic,” the NHC said on Tuesday. It is expected to lessen to a storm Thursday.

CNN reports: “When Danielle became a named storm last Thursday, it was the first since July 3 — meaning last month was the first August in 25 years to go without a single named storm in the Atlantic.The last time a season’s first hurricane came this late was on September 11, 2013, with Hurricane Humberto.”

Bermuda’s Emergency Measure Organisation (EMO) will meet Wednesday (Sept 7) morning, according to the Minister of National Security, Michael Weeks, who will chair the meeting to get the latest update on the storm and to assess member agencies’ preparedness.

According to the Bermuda Weather Service (BWS) Tropical Storm Earl is now considered a potential threat to Bermuda – see latest update here: Bermuda Weather Service.

The Ministry noted that Hurricane Earl “will likely bring a rapid onset of conditions as Earl’s forward speed is expected to be increasing as it approaches and passes the island”.

“Of particular note, the Parks Department’s lifeguards have been extremely active today with multiple rescues on the south shore beaches, where hazardous surf and rip currents continue to build.

“In that regard, the public are urged to exercise caution should they venture into the ocean on the south shore.”

Minister Weeks also stated: “I am reiterating my previous messages about preparedness.

“We know we are in the peak of our hurricane season, and Bermuda is no stranger to serious storms.

“Bermuda will certainly feel the effects from Earl, so we must guard against complacency,” he said.

“As a country, we’ve been successful in managing through hurricanes by being ready and prepared. Following tomorrow’s EMO meeting, I will provide a further update to the public.”

To assist residents in getting ready, homeowners and business should consider doing some of the following:

  • Inspect and ensure their roof, windows, shutters, and doors are in good order and make any necessary repairs.
  • Review family hurricane plans and update them with any changes to phone numbers and other important information.
  • Take stock of all medical prescriptions their family and pets. Ensure you have at least two weeks supply on hand.
  • Check their hurricane kit(s) to make sure they have working flashlights, a portable radio with spare batteries and a stock of non-perishable food to last for seven days.
  • Ensure their home insurance policy is up to date.  
  • Visit vulnerable neighbours and ask them if they need any help with their preparations. 

For the latest updates regarding this storm system, visit http://www.weather.bm.

Weather conditions are “expected to deteriorate rapidly on Thursday” as Earl approaches from the south.

Forecasters added: “Be advised that rip currents and hazardous surf conditions will continue along south shore.”

By Taylor Ward, CNN Meteorologi

Earl is the fifth named storm of the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season.

Earl is the fifth named storm of the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season.

(CNN)Tropical storm Earl has strengthened into a hurricane, according to the National Hurricane Center. Hurricane Earl, just the second of this Atlantic season, has sustained winds of 80 mph with even higher gusts.

The hurricane is moving north at 6 mph. It is expected to continue strengthening into a major, Category 3 storm as it passes east of Bermuda Thursday night.

A tropical storm watch remains in effect for Bermuda.

Earl is expected to eventually move northeast, away from any land mass.

Earl is expected to eventually move northeast, away from any land mass.

“Earl’s center is expected to pass to the southeast of Bermuda in 48-60 hours. However, the size of the wind field of the tropical cyclone is expected to increase significantly, and the Bermuda Weather Service has issued a tropical storm watch,” the hurricane center said.

The storm is forecast to move northeast from there, away from any land mass.

Earl became the fifth named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season Friday, forming 185 miles east of the Leeward Islands.

Bermuda is under a tropical storm watch.

Bermuda is under a tropical storm watch.

Danielle, which on Friday became the first of this season’s Atlantic hurricanes, is still churning far out in the ocean and was “producing a large area of dangerous seas over the north-central Atlantic,” the NHC said Tuesday afternoon in an update. It is expected to lessen to a storm Thursday.

When Danielle became a named storm last Thursday, it was the first since July 3 — meaning last month was the first August in 25 years to go without a single named storm in the Atlantic.

The last time a season’s first hurricane came this late was on September 11, 2013, with Hurricane Humberto.

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30. The areas covered include the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea.

CNN’s Theresa Waldrop, Aya Elamroussi and Derek van Dam contributed to this report.